Otto Rauschenbach, dealer in lumber and general merchandise, at Kimmswick, 
was born in that city in 1863, and was educated there and in St. Louis, 
graduating from the public schools of the latter city in 1878. He then 
spent three years at architecture and building, but was compelled to 
abanden this on account of his eyes.  He then engaged in merchandising 
in partnership with F. D. Waters, at Kimmswick, the firm being Walters 
& Rauschenbach, until 1884, when Waters retired.  Later, Mr. Rauschenbach 
erected a fine two story frame building, opposite the hotel, where he has 
since continued the business with unusual success. Although a young man, 
his ability as a business man is excelled by few if any in the county, 
and a successful future evidently lies before him.  He was married June 
28, 1887, to Miss Josie, daughter of James Gilmartin, of St. Louis.  He 
is a Republican in politics, and his first presidential vote was cast for 
J. G. Blaine, in 1884.  His father, Gustave Rauschenbach, was born in the 
village of Kleimpoerten, Merseburg, Prussia, March 15, 1836.  His father, 
Gottfried Rauschenbach, was a stone cutter by trade, and, after leaving 
school, at the age of fourteen, Gustave learned the same trade, and worked 
at it in Germany until he was seventeen years of age, when he left the 
fatherland for America. He made the trip across the ocean unaccompanied by 
friends or relatives and in June, 1853, landed at New Orleans.  He came at 
once to St. Louis and worked at his trade in that city until 1854, and then 
went with Government troops to Kansas as a stone cutter, and assisted in 
building Fort Riley.  Returning to St. Louis, he next went to Louisville, 
Ky., came back again to St. Louis, and became a resident of Jefferson County,
Mo., in 1856. February 19, 1857, he married Mrs. Elizabeth Rasch (Miss Meyer), 
who became the mother of Otto.  In 1868 he abandoned farming, moved to 
Kimmswick, and undertook the marble business.  In 1869 he built the National 
Hotel, a large brick structure, one of the finest in Kimmswick; of which he 
has been the proprietor up to the present time. He has four children living.  
He has been one of the active and enterprising business men of Kimmswick. In 
the fall of 1863 he revisited Europe, and spent some months among his 
relatives, and in the place in which he was born, returning to Missouri in the 
spring of 1864.  In his political principles he has always been a Republican.  
He voted for Lincoln, in 1860.  He is one of the representative Germans of his 
part of the town.