Norman B. Munro, farmer, was born in Scotland, in 1822, son of John and
Ann (Breid) Munro.  The father was a plasterer by trade.  Norman B. was
educated at St. Andrew's College, one of the oldest and most famous 
institutions of learning in Scotland. He was married March, 1847 to Anna
Armstrong, a native of North Ireland, and of the seven children born to
this union four are now living: George C., James A., David Alexander 
(of Illinois) and John Clifton.  In 1850 Mr. Munro came to the United
States and settled near Albany, N. Y., but moved from there to Putnam
County, then to Westchester County, where he lived until 1867, at which
date he came to Jefferson County, Mo., and located two miles east of
Hematite, where he has a fine farm of 147 acres.  He has been engaged 
in agricultural pursuits all his life, and has spared no pains in the
advancement of his children, both morally and intellectually.  He is
strictly independent in all partisan affairs.  He is a Presbyterian in
his religion, and has put forth every effort to establish an organization 
of that denomination in his neighborhood, but as yet has not been
successful.  Mr. Munro lost one child in the old country and two in 
this, viz.: Norman W., who died November 13, 1881, at the age of twenty
two; Anna Mary, wife of Frederick A. Pedley, married in 1868, and died
August 12, 1887, leaving four children: Alice (now Mrs. Louis Funk),
Lillie, Norman and Mabel.  Much credit is due to Mr. and Mrs. Munro for
the abolition of the dram shops in Hematite, and for the high moral and
social standing of the people of the town, for which virtue Hematite is
unsurpassed by any village in the State.