Marion M. Lewis, farmer, was born in St. Louis, in 1828, and is the
eldest of eight children born to John and Nancy M. (Curry) Lewis. 
John Lewis was born in Virginia about 1790, and in 1796 came with
his father, John Lewis, to St. Louis, where the latter immediately
erected a grist and saw mill on Creve Coeur Creek, about sixteen 
miles west of St. Louis, which he operated for a number of years,
until after the death of his wife, when he went to Texas, and here
spent the remainder of his days.  He was of rather a roving disposition, 
and had in early life acquired a taste for frontier life.  He was among 
the earliest white settlers of what is now St. Louis County being there 
when it required the united efforts of the whites to subdue the Indians.  
The father of Marion M. was reared in the pioneer days of Missouri with 
but very little education.  At the age of seventeen he joined what was 
called the "Government Rangers," in which service he continued in the 
Missouri River country against the Indians until twenty one years of age.  
He was twice married, and lived in St. Louis County many years, where his 
wife died, and where he married the mother of Marion.  In about 1839 he 
removed to Jackson County, but about one year later returned to St. Louis 
County, and from there moved to Greene County, Ill., soon after. Not being 
satisfied, he again returned to St. Louis County, and two years later
settled fourteen miles from the city, on the "Bonhomme Road."  He remained 
there until 1846, when he removed to where St. Paul is, on the Missouri 
Pacific Railroad, where he died one year later.  He was a life long and well 
to do farmer.  The mother of the subject of this sketch was born in Kentucky 
and died about 1865.  Her father, James Curry, was a native Kentuckian, but, 
came to St. Louis soon after the arrival of Mr. Lewis, but afterward removed 
to Greene Co., Ill., where he died.  He was a captain in the War of 1812, 
under Gen. Harrison, and was at the battle of the Thames.  He was of Scotch 
descent.  Marion M. Lewis remained at home until twenty two years of age, and 
received his education in the common schools.  In 1852 he married Miss Clara 
Byrd, a native of Jefferson County, and the daughter of Austin and Mary Byrd, 
natives, respectively, of Georgia and Kentucky, but who in a very early day 
came to Jefferson County, being one of the pioneers of that county. Of the 
eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Lewis only three are now living: Nannie, 
Alexander and Mary May.  Mr. Lewis lived in St. Paul and vicinity until 1877, 
when he came to Jefferson County, and settled near Maxville, on the Byrd farm.  
He has been a life long farmer, is a Democrat in politics (as his father was 
before him) and is a member of the Masonic fraternity.