CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF MISSOURI (THE CENTER STATE)
One Hundred Years in the Union 1820-1921

ILLUSTRATED
VOLUME IV
ST. LOUIS—CHICAGO
THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY ©1921

 

WILLIAM E. ARTHUR pg. 1002
William E. Arthur, editor and proprietor of the Crystal City Press, and one of the most prominent residents of Crystal City, was born July 8, 1861, on a farm near Georgetown, Brown county, Ohio, where General Grant was born. His father was George Arthur, a native of Wales, who came to the United States with his parents when he was a child. He engaged in farming and passed away when his son William was three years old. The mother of William E. Arthur was Elizabeth Parks Arthur, a native of Ohio who departed this life in 1895. William E. Arthur received his early education in Brown county, Ohio, and Champaign county, Illinois, becoming a resident of the latter county when he was six years of age. After he left school he worked on a farm for two years and then obtained a position in the office of the Tolono Herald, Tolono, Illinois, where he remained four or five years, learning the printing and publishing business. He then went to Chicago and other cities and worked in various  newspaper and job offices and in 1892 moved to St. Louis and there acquired valuable experience in his trade. In 1917 he removed to Crystal City and bought the Crystal City Press from R. G. Townsend who founded the paper in 1916 and had ever since been the editor and proprietor. The paper and the business have grown from practically nothing to the best equipped plant in the county. The circulation of the Press has more than doubled since Mr. Arthur has been in charge of it, and the job business has increased fourfold, which speaks well for the present editor and manager.

Mr. Arthur was married November 7, 1891, to Miss Isabel C. Bushnell, daughter of William Bushnell of New York city, now deceased. The Bushnell family is of English descent. Mr. Arthur is a staunch supporter of the Republican Party and has always been active in the interests and affairs of that party, though he has never been an office-holder or a candidate. Fraternally he has membership with the Masons, Shekinah Lodge, No. 256. of Festus. He is a member of the Missouri Press Association and has been secretary of the Crystal City Library Association since its organization. He is one of the organizers and is director and president of the Crystal City Savings and Loan Association. Mrs. Arthur is a public accountant of much capability and is also musically inclined. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur were both very active during the World war, Mrs. Arthur having been auditor of the women’s council of defense of St. Louis and was treasurer of the Soldiers and Sailors Club of St. Louis.

Mr. Arthur is justly accorded a place among the prominent and representative men of Crystal City, for he belongs to that class of men whose enterprising spirit is used to advance the general good and promote public prosperity and his strong personality inspires the friendship of those who know him.

 

ROSCOE THOMAS BURNS, D. D. S.   pg 933
A young man rapidly gaining distinction in the dental profession of Jefferson county is Dr. Roscoe Thomas Burns, who has an extensive and lucrative practice in Crystal City. He is a native of Illinois, having been born at Sparta that state, July 20, 1890, a son of John S. and Martha Jane (Craig) Burns. John S. Burns is now living on his farm near Sparta. He was born in Randolph County near Sparta in 1865, and has spent the greater part of his life in farming. In 1914 he accepted a position as manager for a feed business in Sparta and has also been agent for the Adams and American Express Companies at that place. The father of John S. Burns was John Burns, a native of the same locality as his son and of Scotch ancestry. The mother of Dr. Roscoe T. Burns was before her marriage Miss Martha Jane Craig and she is still living, making her home on the farm near Sparta. She was born in 1870, near Nashville, Illinois, the daughter of John Craig, who was born in Scotland and emigrated with his parents to this country, settling in Illinois.

Dr. Roscoe T. Burns received his education in the public schools of Randolph County, Illinois, and was graduated from the Sparta high school in 1910. The following year he took a commercial course in the same high school, after the completion of which he went to St. Louis and entered the Washington University dental department. The summers during his study at this university were spent in working and he paid his way through in this manner. In 1914 he was graduated with, the degree of D. D. S. and was also vice president of his class. He immediately started into practice at Oakville, Illinois, where he remained for three months, when he removed to Festus where he is now maintaining offices.

On the 10th of January, 1920, Dr. Burns was united in marriage to Miss Isabel Crocker, a daughter of Harry Crocker of St. Louis. Her father was born in England and came to Missouri when twenty years of age. He is now manager of the Brown Storage Company of St. Louis and is a successful business man. The political faith of Dr. Burns is that of the Republican Party and he was reared in the faith of the Presbyterian church. Fraternally he is a Knight of Pythias holding membership in Festus Lodge, No. 151, and he is likewise a Mason, being a member of Shekinah Lodge, No. 256, of Festus, of which he is junior deacon, a member of Missouri Consistory, No. 1, of St. Louis, and has attained the eighteenth degree in the Scottish Rite. In the line of his profession Dr. Burns is a member of the National Dental Association and the Southeastern Missouri Dental Association. Dr. Burns entered into the World war on the 1st of January, 1917, when he was examined at Jefferson barracks and on the 30th of July, the same year, was commissioned first lieutenant in the dental section of the medical corps. In May, 1918, he was assigned to active service at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, at the officer’s medical training school and remained there but two months when he sailed for Prance, July 30, 1918. as a casual officer. They finally landed at La Havre, having come by the way of Liverpool, and he was sent direct to Paris. Being a casual officer he was sent to different stations and his last station was at Camp Hospital, No. 26, St. Aignon, France, where he arrived after the signing of the armistice. On the 30th of July, 1919, he left France and received his discharge on the 15th of August, 1919. He had been promoted to a captaincy which commission he now holds in the reserves. Dr. Burns is an active member of the American Legion post in Festus. The Burns family have always been patriots, the paternal grandfather of Dr. Burns having had seven brothers in the Union army. Both Dr. and Mrs. Burns are prominent in the social circles of Festus, and Mrs. Burns is a singer of note. The greater part of Dr. Burns’ time is devoted to his profession, in the circles of which he is well known and highly esteemed.

 

JOHN GRIER CHRISTY, D. D. S.   pg 884
Prominent among the men of his profession in Festus is Dr. John Grier Christy who has maintained dental offices there since August 1, 1920. He is not a native of Missouri for he was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 9, 189 3, a son of Grier and Carrie (Johnson) Christy. The death of the father occurred in 1905. At the time of his death he was in possession of several farms and had spent the greater part of his life in managing them. He was a prominent man of his community and for some time was auditor of Clermont County in addition to holding other local offices. Grier Christy was born in Marathon, Ohio, the son of Joseph Christy also a native of that place. The wife of Grier Christy was before her marriage Miss Carrie Johnson and she is now residing in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her birthplace was Marathon, Ohio, and she was a daughter of John R. Johnson, a native of Batavia, Ohio, who engaged in farming the greater part of his life.

John R. Johnson was also county assessor several terms and held the office of mayor for some time. His father was Alf Johnson, a native of Ripley, Ohio, and a farmer of prominence. His death occurred in 1900. The Johnson family came to Ohio from Pennsylvania in the early part of the nineteenth century. They were of Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry. Dr. John Grier Christy received his education in the public schools of Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated from the Hillsboro, Ohio, high school with the class of 1911. He then entered the Ohio Wesleyan University for a period of two years, at the end of which time he decided upon a professional career. In 1916 he was graduated from the Kansas City Dental College with the degree of D. D. S. and began practice in Kansas City where he continued until the outbreak of the World war. He entered the army as second lieutenant in the infantry, having been through the reserve officers training camp at Fort Riley. He was an old National Guard officer. Dr. Christy was assigned to the Thirty-seventh Division and sent to Camp Sheridan, Alabama, where he remained until the close of the war. He could have served in the medical department but preferred service as a soldier. He received his discharge on the 22nd of December, 1918. He returned to Kansas City where he remained for some time, when on looking around for another desirable town in which to locate he chose Festus as his future home. On the 1st of August, 1920, he removed to that town, established a practice and is now one of the most prominent men of his profession throughout the county.

It was on the 21st of August, 1918, that Dr. Christy was united in marriage to Miss Fern Booker, the daughter of William Booker who was for many years a telegraph operator at Vandalia, Illinois. Mr. Booker was born at Montrose, Illinois, and died in 1904. Dr. Christy is a staunch supporter of the Democratic Party as have been all of the family, but he has never been very active, nor has he sought nor desired public office. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church and in college he was a member of the Psi Omega fraternity. He is an active member of the Murray Davis Post of the American Legion of Kansas City and in the line of his profession is affiliated with the Kansas City Dental Association. For recreation Dr. Christy  turns to all kinds of outdoor sports. He coaches the high school and city basket-ball teams and referees the football games. He is known to be always just in his decisions and* is thoroughly familiar with every phase of coaching and refereeing. Dr. Christy is also fond of hunting and is very proficient in that sport. While but a young man Dr. Christy has gained the very high respect of his fellows in the profession and in Festus he is readily acknowledged a progressive and representative citizen.

 

ROBERT COXWELL pg. 988
In 1873 Robert Coxwell founded the present business of R. Coxwell and Son. Dealers in furniture and also embalmers and undertakers, being the first business of its kind in De Soto county. Until March 1, 1888, Mr. Coxwell conducted the business alone, but on that date his son, Ernest Shadrach, became of age and was taken into the business as a partner. The business has grown to immense proportions and is the largest of its kind in the district. Robert Coxwell is a native of England, his birth having taken place in Colaton, Raleigh Devon, on the 31st of January, 1844, a son of Shadrach and Anna (Sellek) Coxwell. Shadrach Coxwell is now deceased. He was born in Dowland, Devonshire, England, and throughout the latter part of his life engaged in the floral business. His early life was spent in farming. Shadrach Coxwell was originally a member of the Church of England but in later years adhered to the faith of the Plymouth Brethren church, as did his wife. His father engaged in farming in the same county throughout his lifetime and was a prominent citizen of the community.

The mother of Robert Coxwell was before her marriage Anna Sellek, and is now deceased. She was born on Colaton Raleigh and was the daughter of Francis Sellek, a farmer of Devonshire, who served in the yeomanry for many years. The father of Francis Sellek took an active part in repelling an invasion by Napoleon. The residents dressed a number of women in the uniforms of the British soldiery and stood them along the top of the cliffs so that the French would think the place was garrisoned. The ruse proved successful and the French made no attempt to land although they stayed off the coast for two weeks. In the meantime the men, headed by the father of Francis Sellek, made real plans for defense.

The early education of Robert Coxwell was obtained in the public schools at Countess Wear, to which place his parents had removed when he was but five years of age. He later entered the Central school of Exeter and graduated from the Training College at that place when he was but fifteen or sixteen years of age. After putting his text-books aside he entered into the furniture business with an uncle, William Sellek, with the idea of succeeding him in this line of work. However, after two or three years Robert Coxwell left his uncle and removed to Bristol and thence to London, engaging in cabinet work in both places. Not liking London he left England in 1871 and came to America, landing in Boston. In searching for a friend who had preceded him to this country, he came to Jefferson county where he decided to settle. He chose De Soto as a suitable location and in 1873 founded the first furniture store there, and the concern is now known as Robert Coxwell & Son. For many years Robert Coxwell was prominent in the financial circles of De Soto.

In 1886 Mr. Coxwell was united in marriage to Miss Martha Bement, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bement of Maryland, North Devon near Barnstaple. Mrs. Coxwell passed away on the 9th of October, 1900, her death causing deep grief throughout the community where she had so many friends. Three children were born to this union: Ernest Shadrach, Metford Sellek, and Henrietta. Henrietta is now the wife of Samuel M. Stern and they make their home in California where Mr. Stern is engaged in the coach and carriage painting business at San Diego. They are the parents of one child, Dorothea, the wife of a Mr. Joyce by whom she has one son; Metford Sellek Coxwell was born in England on the 31st of August, 1868, and died July 1, 1903, at De Soto. For many years preceding his death he was cashier of the Peoples Bank of De Soto, and his widow who was before her marriage Miss Cora Allen, is still living, making her home in Rolla. Ernest Shadrach Coxwell was born on the 14th of January, 1867, at Exeter, England, and was five years of age when he was brought by his parents to the United States and his home in Missouri. His early education was received in the De Soto public schools and in due time he entered the Southwestern Business College at Springfield, where he took a business course. On the 1st of March, 1888, his twenty-first birthday, he was made a partner in his father’s business, the firm becoming known as Robert Coxwell & Son. He is director and manager of the De Soto Telephone Exchange and is now director in the Peoples Bank, taking his father's place. For twenty-four consecutive years he has been a member of the De Soto school board, district No. 73, and was also president of this board for a number of years. Ernest S. Coxwell has always given his allegiance to the Republican Party, and his religious faith is that of the Congregational church of which he has been trustee for a number of years and one of the deacons for the past three years. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to De Soto Lodge, No. 119, and has been a Knight of Pythias since 1888, having membership in Royal Arch Lodge of De Soto. He is likewise a member of the Modern Woodmen of America.

On the 16th of April, 1890, Mr. Coxwell was united in marriage to Miss Effie Poole, the daughter of Albinus Poole, a farmer of Carroll county, Maryland, and a member of the well known Maryland family of that name. Three children have been born of their union: Rhoda, now the wife of Wilfred Zollman, an electrician of De Soto, and the mother of one child, Martha; Robert Poole Coxwell; and Ernest Gerald Coxwell, who received his education in the public schools of De Soto and is now associated with his father in business. He married Miss Emily Hamilton of De Soto and they have two children. Robert Poole Coxwell graduated from the De Soto high school and then spent two years in the Armour Institute of Technology in Chicago. Completing his course there he went into the telephone business in De Soto in which connection he remained until May, 1918, when he entered the army and left for France in August of that year. He was a member of Field Artillery 339 of the Eighty-eighth Division and served with them until February, 1919, at which time he was mustered out. Robert Poole Coxwell has never married. Robert Coxwell, whose name initiates this review, is a staunch supporter of the Republican Party and the principles for which it stands. He has neither sought nor desired public office, preferring to devote his entire time to his business affairs. He has been prominent in the activities of the Congregational church and is now serving that organization as deacon. For nearly forty years he has been superintendent of the Sunday school, ever since the organization of the church in De Soto, and many times has represented the church at the national conventions. Mr. Cox- well has so directed his efforts and activities as to make action count for the utmost in the ultimate attainment of success and he has won the confidence, goodwill and high regard of all with whom he has been associated.

 

WILLIAM EVERETT CROW  pg 960
William Everett Crow, editor and proprietor of the Jefferson County Republican, was born September 3, 1866, in Perry county, Missouri, on his father’s farm near Perryville. He is the son of David W. Crow who was born in Lincoln County, North Carolina, at the Old Watermill of his grandfather, January 4, 1842, was educated for the ministry and ordained in 1881 in Warrensburg, Missouri. In 1849, his father brought the family to Missouri by wagon from North Carolina, and they settled on a farm in Perry County, Missouri, when David W. Crow was only seven years old. After David W. Crow became a minister he preached steadily for forty years, until his retirement in 1918. He was pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church of De Soto for fourteen years, and this was his last charge. He was school commissioner in Perry county for eight years and from 1894 to 1900 was presiding elder of the St. Louis district. He was pastor at Joplin, Missouri, five years, was a member of the St. Louis conference and a delegate to the general conference at Chicago in 1900.

Rev. David W. Crow served as a private soldier in Company E, First Missouri Light Artillery in the Union army of the Civil war. He was wounded and taken prisoner in the Red River Expedition. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic from the time of its organization. He was married December 3, 1865, to Rebecca Bollinger, a daughter of Moses Bollinger, born in 1820, a native of Bollinger county, Missouri. The county was named for the family. Moses Bollinger’s father was Daniel Bollinger, a native of the same county. Major Bollinger brought a family of twelve boys and a girl from North Carolina and settled in Cape Girardeau county. He was a miller and millwright and constructed the first four flour mills built in Missouri. He was a man of wealth and influence, having been a member of the first Missouri legislature. The Bollingers are of Dutch ancestry.

Rev. David Crow has a brother and sister living: Albert T. Crow, a retired farmer of Perry county, Missouri; and Mrs. Martha A. Cecil of Dunklin county, Missouri. David Crow’s father, Richard Crow, a native of North Carolina, was a linen weaver. He became a Methodist Episcopal minister in 1839 and preached until he passed away in 1858. Both father and son were pioneer preachers of great energy and earnestness. The father of Richard Crow was also Richard Crow, a native of the north of Ireland, a Protestant who was compelled to leave Ireland. He came to North Carolina in 1780, in about the end of the Revolutionary war. He married Nancy Ware, a woman of Scotch descent, who was a fellow passenger on the ship coming to the United States.

William Everett Crow acquired his early education in the common schools of Perry county until he was eighteen years of age, when he attended the school of Marble Hill, called Mayfield-Smith Academy, for one year. The following year he worked on the farm and in 1884 was given a position in the office of the Vindicator at Bloomfield, Stoddard County, Missouri, and remained in this position seven years, learning the printing and publishing trade. In 1890 he removed to De Soto and became foreman of the newspaper called The Facts. He purchased this paper after its consolidation with a publication at Hillsboro in 1895, and it was printed under the name of the Jefferson County Republican, and he has been sole owner ever since. He also bought the plant and job business of that paper. Under his direction the circulation has grown from six hundred to over two thousand editions and the job business is now the largest in the county.

William Everett Crow was married April 28, 1894, to Bessie J. Butler, a daughter of Benjamin F. Butler and Jennie (Reppey) Butler. Mr. Butler was a native of Jefferson county and his grandfather owned the land where De Soto is now situated. He was a captain in the Union army in the Civil war and his father was William Butler who was born in Jefferson County. He was the son of Edmund Butler a native of Massachusetts who moved to Missouri in 1775. To Mr. and Mrs. Crow were born eight children: Lulu S. Crow, an accomplished musician, is employed in the Missouri Pacific auditing department; Harry S. Crow is also employed in the Missouri Pacific auditing department. He was eighteen years of age when he enlisted and went overseas to fight in the World war, in which he took part in twelve engagements and was gassed. He was a corporal in the Forty-second Heavy Artillery and when the armistice was signed had passed his examination for a commission as lieutenant. He went through some of the great battles and finished at the Samour officers training school in France. He enlisted April 6, 1916, and was discharged in March, 1919; Ralph E. Crow is employed in the Missouri Pacific shops; David Benjamin Crow, George A. Crow, and William Robert Crow are all students in school at De Soto. Richard Paul and Harold Edwin Crow are twins, and were born August 4, 1916.

Mr. Crow gives his political support to the Republican Party and is actively interested in the affairs of that party, although he has never held an elective office. He has served on the state republican committee and was publicity director of the state committee in the campaign of 1907. Mr. Crow was postmaster of De Soto eight years from 1896 until 1904, having been appointed by McKinley and Roosevelt. He was city clerk for four years, president of the board of education three years and also conducts a general insurance agency. He is a member of the De Soto Methodist Episcopal church where he holds the office of steward. Fraternally he has membership with the Masons, De Soto Lodge No. 119, the Knights of Pythias, Royal Arch Lodge No. 47, the Elks No. 689, of De Soto, and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. For ten or twelve years he was secretary of the Southeast Missouri Press Association, and is a member of the International Typographical Union, No. 513, of De Soto. Mr. Crow is very much interested in literature, is an omnivorous reader, and when his work does not demand all of his attention finds recreation in athletics, taking a keen delight in hunting. He has been very active in promoting the interests and upbuilding of his city and county. He conducts his paper in a capable manner and it is now one of the best publications in that section. Mr. Crow is a popular man of fine business ability, unassuming but forceful, and his many friends consider his opinions in connection with both public and private affairs of great value and worth.

 

JESSE FRANKLIN DONNELL, M. D.   pg 918
A prominent physician of Crystal City is Dr. Jesse Franklin Donnell who has been practicing there since 1893. He has built up an extensive and lucrative general practice and is readily acknowledged one of the foremost members of his profession in Jefferson County. Dr. Jesse F. Donnell was born at Hematite, September 10, 1868, a son of Eli Foster Donnell who is now residing in Festus. James Donnell, the grandfather of our subject, was born in North Carolina in 1786 and when just a boy removed with his parents to Tennessee. While still a young man in company with his two brothers, Eli and Thomas, he went on horseback to what is now Washington county, arriving there in 1800. Thomas became a Presbyterian minister and established a Presbyterian church at Caledonia, being the first of that denomination west of the Mississippi. He also engaged in farming. The other two brothers, James and Eli, moved to Jefferson county, James settling on the Joachim in Valle township, afterward removing to Plattin township near Rush Tower, where he resided until his death, March 5, 1845. James Donnell was one of the foremost farmers and influential citizens of Jefferson county and his death came as a severe blow to his community. He was a veteran of the Black Hawk war, his father of the War of 1812, and his grandfather of the Revolutionary war. The paternal grandmother of our subject was born in one of the eastern states and in 1792 removed  with her parents to Indiana and subsequently to Jefferson county. Her death occurred in 1839. At an early day Eli F. Donnell was thrown upon his own resources by the death of his parents but managed to obtain all of the education possible at that time. He engaged in such work as he could find and for some time hauled lead from the Washington Company mines to the Mississippi with three yoke of oxen. When twenty years of age he crossed the plains to California and was six months making the trip. For three and one-half years he remained in that state and then returned to Jefferson County by way of Central America and New York. He was extremely fond of travel and soon after his return home made a trip through Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas and the territories.

On the 9th of April, 1856, Eli F. Donnell was united in marriage to Miss Laura England, the daughter of James and Margaret England of Plattin township. She died on the 11th of December, 1884, leaving seven children of whom Dr. Jesse F. Donnell is the sixth in order of birth. Eli F. Donnell resided in Plattin township until 1868, where with a brother-in-law he engaged in the wood and merchandise business in addition to farming for a period of two years. He then retired to his farm where he engaged extensively in stock dealing and raising. He is now making his home in Festus. The education of Dr. Jesse F. Donnell was received in the public schools of Jefferson County, until he was nineteen. Then he worked on his father’s farm as he did also while in school. In 1889 he went to St. Louis and entered the Beaumont Hospital Medical College from which institution he was graduated in 1891 with the degree of M. D. He practiced at Hematite for eighteen months and took post-graduate work in Washington University Medical School in 1892, graduating in April, 1893. In the fall of that year he located in Festus where he commenced his practice and at the same time entered into the drug business with John R. Funk as Donnell & Funk. His interest in this business he soon afterward sold out to Mr. Funk and about 1910 removed to Crystal City where he still resides. His practice has always been of a general nature and he is particularly interested in obstetrics. Dr. Donnell has attended the birth of over some two thousand children. In addition to his professional duties Dr. Donnell is president of the Donnell Milk Company of St. Louis which is a modern and sanitary milk plant conducted on a large scale. He owns the  controlling interest in the Festus Drug Company, is president of the Festus Telephone Company and in the financial circles of his former home is also prominent, being vice president and director of the Farmers & Merchants Bank. He operates a plantation of twelve hundred and fifty-nine acres in Louisiana where he raises cotton as well as stock and diversified farm products.

On the 30th of December, 1912, Dr. Donnell was united in marriage to Miss Bonita H. Gulick, a daughter of William H. and Dosha (Page) Gulick, residents of Paris, Texas. Mrs. Gulick was born near Kansas City. The Pages are of English descent and can trace their family history back for more than six hundred years. They have resided in Missouri for many years. Two children have been born to the union of Dr. and Mrs. Donnell: Catherine Page and Laura Anne. Since age conferred upon Dr. Donnell the right of franchise he has been a staunch supporter of the Democratic Party and the principles for which it stands. He has served as committeeman on various committees and has been tendered many nominations, which he always refused. His religious faith is that' of the Methodist church, while his wife is a consistent member of the Church of Christ. Fraternally Dr. Donnell is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias having membership in Jefferson Lodge, No. 151, of Festus. His father is a prominent Mason and is a charter member of Shekinah Lodge, No. 256, of Festus. As an associate of those organizations calculated to bring about the progress and unification of the medical profession Dr. Donnell is a member of the Jefferson County Medical Society, which organization he is serving as president; of the American Medical Association; and the Missouri State Medical Association, and he has lectured on general medicine in one of the medical colleges of St. Louis. He is a great lover of fine horses and owns some trotters and pacers at this time. Being much interested in literature he is a great reader and acquires most of "his recreation in this manner. In addition to his general practice Dr. Donnell is associate surgeon for the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, local surgeon for the Frisco Railroad and the Mississippi River Railroad. As a loyal American citizen he was very active during the World war and gave of his time to service on county and local boards.

 

ROBERT EDWIN DONNELL, M. D.  pg 904
One of the most prominent and well known physicians of De Soto, Jefferson County, is Dr. Robert Edwin Donnell, who is also a director and president of the Farmers & Citizens State Bank. He is a native of Missouri, having been born on his father’s farm five miles southeast of De Soto, November 1, 1877. His father, Thomas Jefferson Donnell, was a son of Eli Donnell, further mention of whom is made in the review of Dr. Jesse F. Donnell to be found on another page of this work. Thomas Jefferson Donnell was born in Jefferson County on the land which his father entered from the government in the early part of the nineteenth century. He was a man of strong character and religious beliefs, and in addition to farming, which occupation he followed throughout his entire life, he served as county judge of Jefferson County for some time. The mother of Robert Edwin Donnell and the wife of Thomas Jefferson Donnell, was Paulina Pinson Donnell, who was born about a mile south of De Soto and is now making her home in De Soto. She was the daughter of Leander Pinson, a farmer of Jefferson county who was born on a farm in Washington county. Her grandfather was Aaron Pinson, a native of Kentucky who came to Missouri as a young man and settled in Washington county. Dr. Robert E. Donnell obtained his education in the common schools of Jefferson county until he was seventeen years of age, when he entered the De Soto high school from which institution he was graduated in 1897. He then decided upon a medical career and as a result entered the Beaumont Medical College in St. Louis, graduating in 1900 with the degree of M. D. After a year as an interne in Alexian Brothers Hospital at St. Louis, he went to Bloomsdale, Missouri, where he entered into practice and remained there for three and one-half years, building up an extensive patronage. In the fall of 1904 he took a post-graduate course at Marion Sims Beaumont Medical College, studying general medicine and surgery and in 1905 chose De Soto as a desirable location and resumed his practice which he still continues. Since 1912 he has operated the principle drug store of this town in addition to his professional duties, and since 1909 has been resident surgeon for the Missouri Pacific Railroad.

Dr. Donnell was one of the organizers of the Farmers & Citizens State Bank at De Soto and has served as director and president. The bank was organized with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars and this organization is highly prosperous. The bank paid a dividend its third year. On the 2d of October, 1907, Dr. Donnell was married to Miss Rachael E. Rippy,[Reppy] a daughter of Samuel Rippy, ,[Reppy]  a lawyer of Jefferson county for many years, who is now retired and living in De Soto. The Rippy ,[Reppy] family is one of the oldest in  this section of the state. Samuel Rippy ,[Reppy] was born in Jefferson county, a son of Hamilton S. Rippy ,[Reppy] whose birth occurred in St. Charles, Missouri, in 1810. When an infant Hamilton S. Rippy,[Reppy]  removed with his parents to Potosi and in later life became a progressive and well known merchant of Jefferson county. His death occurred in 1876. The father of Hamilton S. Rippy,[Reppy]  was Henry S. Rippy, ,[Reppy]  who was born in Ireland and came to the United States in 1810, settling in St. Charles. Mrs. Donnell was born in Prescott, Arkansas, the third in order of birth in a family of seven children born to Samuel Rippy,[Reppy]. Three children have been born to Dr. and Mrs. Donnell: Robert Edwin, Jr.; Virginia Maurine; and Thomas Allison. All three are attending the De Soto public schools.

Since age conferred upon Dr. Donnell the right of franchise he has been a staunch supporter of the democratic party. For the past five years he has been serving as county health officer, receiving his appointment by the county court. Fraternally he is a Mason, having membership in De Soto Lodge, No. 119. He is likewise a member of Copestone Chapter, R. A. M., No. 33, of De Soto, and is a Knight Templar of De Soto Commandery, No. 56. Dr. Donnell is also affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, belonging to De Soto Lodge. The religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist Episcopal church and Dr. Donnell has been a steward for a number of years and is also actively interested in Sunday school work. As an associate of those organizations calculated to bring about the progress and unification of the medical profession he is a member of the American Medical, Missouri State, and Jefferson County Associations. He is county chairman of the Missouri Tuberculosis Association, and during the World war was on the county registration, draft and examining board. Dr. Donnell is literarily inclined and he is a great reader. Few men are more prominent in professional and business circles than Dr. Donnell and he is readily recognized as one of De Soto’s most progressive and representative citizens.

 

WILLIAM ROBERT DONNELL  pg 955
Prominent in the financial circles of Festus is William Robert Donnell who is cashier of the Citizens Bank at that place. He is a native son of Missouri, his birth having occurred near Bailey Station in Jefferson County, January 4, 1846. His parents were William A. and Emma (Edwards) Donnell, both natives of Jefferson County. The birth of William A. Donnell occurred in 1817 southeast of De Soto. He engaged in farming all of his life and died a well-to-do and influential man on the 31st of March, 1873. He married Emma Edwards, a member of a very old and distinguished family, and to them ten children were born of whom William Robert Donnell is the sixth in order of birth. The death of Mrs. Donnell occurred in 1873 at the age of ninety years, she being at the time of her demise one of the oldest women in the county. The paternal grandfather of our subject was James Donnell, who was one of the signers of the original petition for the statehood of Missouri, his name being easily readable on that document preserved in the Jefferson Memorial Library, and further mention of whom may be found in the review of Dr. Jesse F. Donnell on another page of this work. The education of William Robert Donnell was obtained in the schools of his county and from 1870 until 1890 he served continuously as county clerk of Jefferson county. The following year after the expiration of his term of office Mr. Donnell entered the Citizens Bank of Festus as cashier, which position he still
retains to the complete satisfaction of the bank and its patrons.

It was on the 19th of December, 1866, that Mr. Donnell was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Belle Berry, a daughter of Willis G. Berry, a farmer of Jefferson County. Her father was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and came to Missouri as a young man, settling in Jefferson County. An uncle of William Robert Donnell, Thomas L. Donnell, married a sister of Margaret Belle Berry’s mother. The mother of Mrs. Donnell was Sarah McCormack. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Donnell  eight children have been born, four of whom are now living: Sarah Emma, now the wife of Ford S. Dodds, a train dispatcher on the Reading Railroad at Philadelphia. They are the parents of two boys, Robert and Frank, both of whom served in France during the World war; William R. Donnell, the second member of the family, is cashier of the Bank of Hillsboro and he has served his county as treasurer for two terms. He married Miss Gertrude Holmes; Laura Bell is the wife of D. P. Parhan, a teacher in the Chicago public schools. They have one son, Edwin Ware, aged sixteen years, a musician of much ability. The second son of the family, James L. Donnell, is collector of Jefferson County and is making his home in Hillsboro. For some time he worked in the bank in connection with his father. He married Miss Georgia Renner of Stoddard county and has become the father of three children: William Robert, Elizabeth Belle, and Margaret Ann.

Mr. Donnell has always given his allegiance to the  Democratic Party in the activities of which he takes a prominent part. He is a consistent member of the Festus Methodist Episcopal church and has served as steward at different times. In his younger days he also served as superintendent of the Sunday school. In his capacity as cashier of the Citizens Bank Mr. Donnell is brought into contact with the public and has many friends who appreciate his true personal worth. He is always interested in the development and improvement of his community and is a progressive and representative citizen of Festus.

 

ALBERT SIDNEY ENNIS pg 760

Although admitted to the bar in June, 1912, Albert Sidney Ennis of Festus, has only since January 1, 1919, engaged in the general practice of that profession. He has been connected -with various business activities and is also an agriculturist of note. Albert Sidney Ennis was born in Gentryville, Gentry County, Missouri, on the 1st of September, 1878, a son of Edwin Eugene and Mary Matilda (Sparks) Ennis. Edwin Eugene Ennis was born in Pennsylvania and came to Missouri with his parents when he was but a youth. They settled in Clay county and Edwin E. Ennis was elected county clerk of that county before he was of age, consequently being unable to hold the office. When the Civil war broke out he was one of the first to enlist and served under General Sterling Price in the Confederate army. During an engagement he was taken prisoner and held as such in Cameron for a few months, when he escaped one rainy night with another prisoner. They lowered a blanket from the window to the ground, which they reached safely, and while in hiding they were given food by a woman sympathizer. About forty years later Albert Sidney Ennis met this woman at Sedalia, Missouri, where she now makes her home.

 

Edwin E. Ennis had five brothers in the Union army. Mr. Ennis has always been active in business circles, although he is now living in California, Missouri, retired. He was cashier of the Farmers Bank of King City, Gentry County, for ten years and secretary of the Universal Building and Loan Association for the same length of time. For about ten years he was assessor of Gentry County and for some years represented Gentry County in the legislature. The mother of Albert Sidney Ennis whose name initiates this review, is now residing in California, Missouri, she and her husband being prominent citizens of that place. She was born in Jeffersonville, Indiana, the daughter of Levi T. Sparks, a wholesale grocer and retail dry goods merchant. Her father was an active southern sympathizer and at one time was sentenced to death but was saved through the influence of a Union officer. For several terms Levi T. Sparks served as mayor of Jeffersonville.

 

Albert Sidney Ennis received his education in the public schools of Gentryville and later, removing with his parents to King City, entered the high school there and was graduated with the class of 1895. After putting his textbooks aside he went into the office of the King City Chronicle, where he spent two years learning the newspaper business from top to bottom including typesetting. He became foreman of the King City Democrat at the time Bryan was running for president and held this position for one year, when he again removed with his parents, this time to Jefferson City. He resumed his trade in that city and in addition took up the study of shorthand. On the completion of the course he went to Sedalia and became connected with the law firm of Shirk & Hastain in the capacity of stenographer. During the year spent in this latter connection he studied law and then went to Maysville where he bought a half interest in the De Kalb County Herald, sold out to his partner in a few months, and returned to Jefferson City where for three years he was engaged in the wholesale grocery business. This firm went out of business and Mr. Ennis removed to St. Louis where for twelve years he was employed as secretary and inside man for the De Camp Coal Mining Company. The last seven years he spent in working for them he was credit man. Throughout all these years he had continued the study of law in spare time with the result that in June, 1912, he was admitted to the bar upon examination before the Supreme Court of the state. He did not immediately enter into practice, however, for he moved onto his farm in Jefferson County and engaged extensively in stock raising until the 1st of January, 1919. At this time he moved to Festus and entered into general practice, and although he has been in that profession but a short time he has built up an extensive and lucrative patronage. Mr. Ennis continues to operate his farm which is located but four miles from Festus. On the 30th of November, 19 04, Mr. Ennis was united in marriage to Miss Ada Delores Wagers, a native of De Kalb county, and a daughter of John T. Wagers and his wife who was before her marriage a Miss Cunningham. Her father is a merchant of King City and president of the King City Chautauqua Association. He was born in Estill county, Kentucky, in the year 185 6, in which county his father was also born, and he came to Missouri with his parents when sixteen- years of age. They settled in De Kalb county and engaged in farming. John T. Wagers has always been a prominent and active man and in business circles is well known. The grandfather of Mrs. Ennis was Simpson Wagers who was born in Virginia and married Miss Martha Prather of Kentucky. The Wagers are of French and English extraction, the great-great-grandfather of Mrs. Ennis being a Frenchman. The mother of John T. Wagers was a Gentry, being a member of the famous family of that name of which there are a great many both in Missouri and in Kentucky. Two Gentry brothers came from England to America years ago and from them sprang two families. General Gentry, who fought in the Seminole war and for whom Gentry County was named, was a descendant of one of the brothers. On the maternal side Mrs. Ennis is a member of the Smith family. Her grandmother was a cousin of John Quincy Adams, a niece of James Dougan of Delphi, Indiana, and also of the late Bishop Dougan of St. Louis whose death occurred there a few years ago. The early religion of both families was that of the Catholic Church. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Ennis two children have been born: Mary Jane, who is now attending the Festus high school; and Helen Elizabeth, attending the common schools of that city.

 

Since age conferred upon Mr. Ennis the right of franchise he has been a staunch supporter of the Democratic Party and the principles for which it stands. He has never taken an active part in political circles, however, preferring rather to devote his entire time to his business and professional interests. Mr. Ennis was reared in the faith of the Presbyterian church and his wife is a member of the Christian church. He belongs to no secret organizations nor societies. During the World war he was chairman of the Jefferson county league to enforce peace and also chairman of the Red Cross at Horine. Mr. Ennis is of a literary turn of mind and has done much writing for agricultural papers. He takes the greatest pride in his stock raising, specializing in Jersey cattle and pure bred hogs. He maintains his home and law offices in Festus and is recognized throughout the community as one of the leading professional, business and agricultural men throughout the county.

 

WILLIAM HENRY FARRAR, M. D.  pg 944
Dr. William Henry Farrar, physician and surgeon, engaged in the practice of his profession in DeSoto, Missouri, was born April 6, 1856, in Arcadia, Iron county, Missouri. His father was Dr. George Washington Farrar, a native of North Carolina, where he was born December 25, 1833. In early life he was professor of languages in the Arcadia Seminary of which J. C. Berryman was the head. He was graduated as M. D. in 1857 from the Washington University and took up the practice of his profession at Arcadia, and during the Civil war he was a surgeon in the Confederate army He was also a farmer and slave holder. He took a keen interest in educational matters and was a regent of the State Normal School at Cape Girardeau and was a school commissioner of Iron county for many years. He was a member of the Methodist church, South, of very firm convictions, and in politics gave his lifelong support to the democratic party. His father was Miles Farrar, a native of North Carolina who was a plantation owner and a slave holder. Miles Farrar removed to Perry county, Missouri, when his son George was ten years old. The Farrar family are of old Scotch ancestry, “Silver Dick” Bland having been a student of George Washington Farrar when he was a teacher. The mother of William Henry Farrar was Harriet Pomeroy Russell who passed away in 1910. She was a native of Somers, Connecticut, the daughter of Cyrus P. Russell who was sent by the United States government to
survey territory in southeast Missouri. He was rewarded by a large tract of land in what is now Madison and Iron counties. This surveying was made while Missouri was yet a territory. He drove from Connecticut to Pittsburgh and journeyed the rest of the way by water. He owned Pilot Knob and Iron Mountain. Arcadia in Iron county was formerly called Russellville in his honor, and he was the first man to discover mineral deposits in Iron Mountain. William Henry Farrar acquired his early education in the Arcadia Seminary where his father was an instructor, and he later attended the St. Louis Medical College, now Washington University, and was graduated from this institution in 1875, but did not receive his degree of M. D. until 1877 when he became twenty-one years of age. He took up his practice at Arcadia for one year with his father, was physician and surgeon at Valles Mines for two years, and in 1879 located in De Soto where he has since remained in the general practice of medicine. He has been the resident surgeon of the Missouri Pacific ever since its hospital system was organized. He is a member of the Missouri State Medical Association and the Jefferson County Medical Association, having been president of the latter for a number of years. He was chairman of the medical advisory board of Jefferson County during the World war and took an active part in all the war drives.

Dr. Farrar was married December 20, 1877, to Margaret A. Cole, daughter of Salathiel Cole, a merchant of  Jefferson county. He was a native of Kentucky, as was her mother. To this union has been born one daughter, Gertrude May, now the wife of Dr. Thomas Clayburn Blackburn who is engaged in the practice of medicine at Hickory, New York. He was a former surgeon in the United States navy. He is a nephew of Senator Joseph C. Blackburn of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn are the parents of two children, William T., and Margaret C., who are students in the schools of Hickory. Dr. Farrar gives his political allegiance to the Democratic Party, though he has never been a candidate for any office. He is a member of the Methodist church.  While most of his time is devoted to the interests of his profession Dr. Farrar is interested in all the sports, although he does not take part in them. The well-established family physician has a far-reaching influence for good in his community, and Dr. Farrar measures up to the highest standard in this respect. He is ever most careful and painstaking in the diagnosis of his cases and his judgment is seldom at fault.

 

RICHARD FRANCIS pg. 987
Richard Francis, cashier of the Bank of Herculaneum, at Herculaneum, Missouri, was born in Bonne Terre, St. Francois County, Missouri on May 4, 1888. He is the son of Mathew Francis now deceased, who came to the United States from England when he was a young man. He first lived in New York city and then in Murfreesboro, Illinois, and later settled in Bonne Terre where he was engaged in the stock and butcher trade. After he had gotten settled in this country he sent for his widowed mother and his brothers and sisters. The mother of Richard Francis was Carrie House who was killed in an accident in Bonne Terre when her son Richard was quite young. After her death he was reared by his grandmother who passed away in 1919 at the age of ninety-three. Richard Francis acquired his early education in the public schools of Bonne Terre. He remained in school until he was sixteen years old, a Junior in high school, and entered the meat and stock business with his two brothers in Bonne Terre, under the firm name of A. and H. Francis. For six years he continued in this business, buying and selling stock until 1911 when he removed to Herculaneum and entered the employ of the Bank of Herculaneum. In 1913 he was elected cashier and director and has since continued in the service of this bank, with the exception of one year when he was cashier of the Bank of Elvins. The Bank of Herculaneum was founded in 1910 with a capital stock of $10,000. The capital stock has not changed but the surplus and undivided profits are $17,000. The total resources have reached $200,000. The president of the Bank of Herculaneum is C. H. Dormeyer of Herculaneum.

Richard Francis is a member of the Congregational church and is president of the Young Men’s Bible class of the Herculaneum Methodist church. He gives his political endorsement to the republican party and while he has always been interested and active in local affairs he has never sought nor desired office. Fraternally he has membership with the Masons, Shekinah Lodge, No. 256, of Festus, R. A. M., Uel Chapter of Bonne Terre, the Missouri Consistory of St. Louis, No. 1, having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, Moolah Temple of the Mystic Shrine, at St. Louis, the Hiram Council of St. Louis, the Knights of Pythias, Mineral Lodge, No. 96, of Bonne Terre, and of the Red Men, White Crow Tribe, No. 199, of Herculaneum. He also has membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Rising Star Lodge, No. 392, of Bonne Terre, and holds the position of past grand master of that lodge. Mr. Francis also belongs to the  American Bankers Association, the Missouri Bankers Association, and the Missouri Athletic Association of St. Louis. He is also a member of the St. Louis Automobile Association.

Mr. Francis is a great lover of good music and plays the cornet in the band. He takes a keen interest in good sportsmanship and devotes much of his time to motoring, baseball and football. He has made for himself a creditable place in business circles and in the regard of his fellowmen who recognize in him a citizen of sterling worth and a business man of thorough reliability.

 

JOHN RUSSELL FUNK   pg 926
John Russell Funk, owner and manager of a drug store in Festus, Missouri, is one of the prominent citizens of that town. He was born April 6, 1870, on the farm belonging to his father about twelve miles south of Festus in Jefferson county. He is the son of Christian Funk, who was born in Frankfort, Germany, in 1830, and came to the United States in 1835 with his widowed mother. They lived near Belleville, Illinois, for a few years and later located in St. Louis where Mr. Funk was married. In 1861 he removed to Jefferson county, Missouri, and bought a farm upon which he lived the remainder of his life. He was a progressive man of firm character, vigorous in body and mind, and became one of the most prominent men in the community. His father was Valentine Funk who was born in Germany where the Funk family had lived for many generations. Christian Funk departed this life January 4, 1918. The mother of John Russell Funk was Ernestine Kuntz, now deceased. She was of German descent and some of her forebears came from Alsace Lorraine. She was born in New York city in 1836 and moved with her family to Kentucky and later to St. Louis, where she was married. She was an earnest Christian and a good wife and mother, having reared eleven children of whom John Russell Funk was the eighth in order of birth. This good woman was summoned to eternal rest in September, 1904.

John R. Funk acquired his early education in the common schools of Jefferson county which he attended until he was twenty-two years of age, during which time he taught school two years in Jefferson county. He was graduated from the Indiana University at Valparaiso in 1893 with the degree of Ph. G. He then went to Festus where he worked as a clerk in the post office and the drug store from 1893 until 1897, when he went into partnership in the drug business with Dr. J. F. Donnell. In 1900 he bought out his partner’s interest in the business, and in 1908 Lee H. Smith, his brother-in-law, became his partner. They are now the owners and managers of two fine drug stores, one in Crystal City and one in Festus.

Mr. Funk was married June 25, 1902, to Agnes I. Miller, the daughter of James Miller, of Alresford, England. The Miller family are of Scotch descent, Mrs. Funk having come from England at the age of seven years with her widowed mother and sister, to Bonne Terre, Missouri. To Mr. and Mrs. Funk have been born three children: Helen Margaret, a student of the Festus high school; John Russell, Jr., and Barclay Lee, students in the Festus schools. In politics Mr. Funk gives his political endorsement to the Democratic Party but has never sought office. He has been city collector for four years, also a member of the city council. Mr. Funk is greatly interested in educational methods and is a member of the school board. He is a director and second vice president of the Farmers & Merchants Bank of Festus, and is vice president of the Merchants’ Association of Festus. Mr. Funk and his family are members of the Festus Methodist Episcopal church, South, where he is a member of the board of stewards and also secretary and treasurer. He has been in the past the superintendent of the Sunday school, an office which he held for six years. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to the Shekinah Lodge No. 256, of Festus, in which he has held the office of senior deacon. He is a member of the Missouri Consistory, No. 1, of St. Louis, having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in November, 1917. He also holds membership with the Modern Woodmen of America, Camp 3163, of Festus, and the Knights of Pythias, Jefferson Lodge, No. 151, of Festus.

Mr. and Mrs. Funk are greatly interested in good literature and devote much of their time to good reading. Mrs. Funk was a student of the Marvin Collegiate Institute at Caledonia, Missouri. Mr. Funk is widely known and everywhere spoken of in terms of high regard because of his personal qualities, his business ability, his enterprise and his loyalty in citizenship. He is ever found with the leaders in support of those progressive measures which are looking to future benefit and upon all vital public questions he keeps thoroughly informed.

 

OLIVER ERNEST HENSLEY, M. D. pg 912
Dr. Oliver Ernest Hensley, physician and surgeon of Herculaneum, Missouri, where he is engaged in the practice of his profession is one of the most prominent men in that city. He was born October 7, 1874, at Pevely, Missouri, on his father’s farm. He is the son of Joel Mellon Hensley who was a Baptist minister, a native of St. Louis county who preached in Jefferson, St. Francois, and Ste. Genevieve counties, and won many friends, as he was one of the best known and highly revered men in that section of the state. He was the son of Fleming Hensley, a native of Virginia who went to Kentucky after his marriage, where he lived about one year. He then came down the Ohio river by flatboat to the Mississippi river and up the Mississippi to Jefferson county, Missouri, where he located and spent the remainder of his life. His father with two brothers came from England and settled in Virginia sometime previous to the Revolutionary war in which they took part, fighting on the side with the States. The mother of Dr. Hensley was Alice M. Williams a native of Jefferson county, the daughter of William Williams, a farmer and tobacco grower. She departed this life October 3, 1917. Oliver Ernest Hensley acquired his early education in the country schools of Jefferson County which he attended until he was sixteen years of age, when he became a student at the Baptist College at Farmington, Missouri, and later studied one year at Kirksville in the State Normal College. He taught school for two years in Jefferson county and then went to St. Louis where he entered the Marion Sims Beaumont Medical College from which he was graduated in 1903 with the degree of M. D. He took up the practice of this profession at Pevely where he remained until 1915 when he removed to Herculaneum and went into partnership with Dr. C. W. Miller in the general practice of medicine. November 1, 1920, Dr. Miller removed to St. Louis and since that time Dr. Hensley has been alone in the practice. He is the physician and surgeon for the St. Joseph Lead Company at Herculaneum and is also local surgeon for the Missouri Pacific Railway and the Missouri River and Bonne Terre Railway. He has taken post-graduate work in the St. Louis University medical college, and has done much in the line of medical surgery. He was coroner of Jefferson County for a period of six years but does not hold that office now.

Dr. Hensley gives his political allegiance to the Democratic Party, but has never held an office other than that of coroner. His religious faith is that of the Baptist church and he attends the Baptist church of Herculaneum and his wife is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church. Dr. Hensley was married January 16, 1908, to Miss Lillian K. Bloecher, the daughter of John Bloecher, a shoe dealer of St. Louis. He was a native of Germany where he was born in 184 8, and came to St. Louis when he was seventeen years of age. Mr. Bloecher departed this life May 25, 1912. Mrs. Hensley’s mother was Mina Oberwinder, the daughter of Philip Oberwinder, a teaming contractor of St. Louis. He was born in Germany and came to the United States when he was a young man and was married here. Philip Oberwinder’s wife was Lucetta Oberwinder, a native of Germany, who came to the United States alone. She passed away in 1918 at the age of eighty-four.

Dr. Hensley has membership with the Masons, belonging to the Joachim Lodge, No. 164, of Hillsboro. He is also a Knight of Pythias, a member of the Acorn Lodge, No. 352, of Herculaneum, and a member of the Woodmen of America at Hillsboro. Professionally he is a member of the Missouri State Medical Association and the Jefferson County Medical Association having been the secretary of the latter for many years. Dr. Hensley devotes most of his time and attention to his profession but he is also concerned in what pertains to public progress and improvement and has cooperated heartily in many movements for the general good, standing at all times for those interests which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride.

 

GEORGE AUSTIN MARSH  pg 945
As superintendent of the St. Joseph Lead Company George Austin Marsh is a representative of one of Herculaneum’s most important business interests. He is not a native son of Missouri, for he was born in Holden, Massachusetts, July 10, 1858, a son of Charles Wheeler and Samantha M. (Austin) Marsh. Charles Wheeler Marsh was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1829, and until his death in December, 1863, was engaged as a stone cutter and marble worker. His father was Thaddeus Marsh, a son of Hartshorn Marsh, the latter being a soldier in the Revolutionary war who participated in the famous battle of Bunker Hill. Hartshorn Marsh was a son of James Marsh whose birth occurred in 1723 and who passed away in 1764 at the age of forty-one years. The father of James Marsh was John Marsh of Medfield, Massachusetts, who was born in 1696 and died in 1769, and John Marsh’s father was Joseph Marsh, born in 1670 and died in 1726. The father of Joseph Marsh was John Marsh, who was born in England and emigrated to this country, settling near what is now Boston. The mother of George Austin Marsh, subject of this review, was Samantha M. Austin, who was a native of Franklin, Vermont, and died in 1911. She was a daughter of David Brown Austin, whose birth occurred in Canada about the year 1800.

Throughout his life he engaged in the blacksmith trade and farming and his black- smith shop was located upon the boundary line between Canada and Vermont. His father was Jotham Austin, born in Rhode Island in 1760. Jotham Austin was a veteran of the War of 1812, and a descendant of Robert Austin, who was born in England about 1630 and later in life emigrated to Rhode Island. The Public Records give him as one of the sixty-five who signed an agreement September 15, 1661, for drawing lots at Westerly, Rhode Island. The education of George Austin Marsh was received in the district schools of Holden, Massachusetts, until he was seventeen years of age at which time he entered the Worcester, Massachusetts, public schools for two years. After completing his course there he worked at odd jobs including farming, work in a woolen mill, teaching school, etc., and in 1879 entered the Worcester Polytechnic Institute from which he was graduated as a chemist in 1882 with the degree of B. S. The winter after his graduation he taught in the Boylston high school while waiting for a position with the Avery Electric Company at Littleton, Massachusetts, and he was with that company from April, 883, until August 1885, as chemist and assistant superintendent. He then went to the Pennsylvania Lead Company at Mansfield Valley (now Carnegie), near Pittsburgh, as a chemist and assayer, and for twelve years remained in that connection until the works closed. In 1897 he removed to Pueblo and became assayer and chemist with the Eilers smelting plant called the Colorado Smelting Company, and was with that company until in May, 1920, when the plant closed. In 1899 all the smelting plants were consolidated and became known as the American Smelting & Refining Company. His rise in the business world was rapid. In 1900 he had been promoted to the position of assistant superintendent and three years later to that of superintendent of the Eilers plant. When in 1907 this plant was closed by the American Smelting & Refining Company he was transferred to the Pueblo plant as superintendent, which position he held until May, 1920, when he accepted a like position at the Herculaneum plant for the St. Joseph Lead Company. For thirty-five years he was connected with the American Smelting & Refining Company and during that time gained the respect of all with whom he came in contact.

On the 12th of May, 1885, at Littleton, Massachusetts, Mr. Marsh was united in marriage to Miss Atlanta G. Tuttle, a daughter of Deacon George W. Tuttle, a manufacturer of dining room furniture in Boston, who now makes his home in Littleton. The grandfather of Mrs. Marsh was Thomas Sparhawk Tuttle, also a native of Littleton, who took his farm from the state in the early part of the eighteenth century. In the Park Street Cemetery in Boston there is a tablet erected to the memory of William Tuttle, the progenitor of the family by that name in America who came from England about 1638. The earliest member of the Sparhawk family to come to this country was Nathaniel Sparhawk, whose birth occurred in England about 1630, and who later emigrated to Cambridge, Massachusetts. Five children have been born to the union of Mr. and Mrs. Marsh: Frances Tuttle, Austin Gerry, Caroline Lawrence, George Austin, Jr., and Helen Gardner. The eldest member of the family, Frances Tuttle, is now the wife of Edward C. Sparrow of Pueblo, Colorado, and they have become the parents of two children: Edward C., Jr., and Helen Louise; Austin Gerry Marsh married Miss Elsie Mae Cox of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and makes his home in Pueblo where he is a mining engineer and has an assay office; Caroline Lawrence Marsh married Edward P. Chapman of Leadville, Colorado, and they have become the parents of three boys: Edward P., Jr., George Marsh, and Joseph Warren; George Austin Marsh, Jr., is living at Miami, Arizona, and is married, his wife having been Miss Ruth C. Sweney. Three children have been born to their union: Ruth Atlanta, George Austin, III, and James Kohler.

Since age conferred upon Mr. Marsh the right of franchise he has been a staunch supporter of the republican party and the principles for which it stands, although he has never taken a very active part in political affairs. Fraternally he is a Mason, holding membership in the South Pueblo, Colorado, Lodge No. 31. The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church and for many years Mr. Marsh was an elder in the Pueblo church and also in Carnegie. He was likewise  Superintendent of the Sunday school in Littleton and later in Carnegie. Mr. Marsh has always taken an active part in the development and improvement of the communities in which he has resided and was one of the trustees of the Teachers College at Greeley and of the State Normal school, also state director of the Y. M. C. A. of Colorado and president of the Pueblo branch of that organization. While residing in Carnegie he was a member of the school board. During the World war Mr. Marsh was a Four Minute man and took an active part in every drive. His son, Austin G., enlisted in the World war in May, 1917, as a member of the Eighteenth Engineers and went to France on the 17th of August, that year, with one of the first contingents to cross. He was in active service in France for nearly two years and had received the rank of lieutenant at the time of his discharge. For some time he had been stationed in the officers’ training camp in France. Mr. Marsh is a member of the Sons of the Revolution and his wife is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Mrs. Marsh is likewise a member of the Wednesday Morning Club of Pueblo and was president of the municipal child welfare work of that city in the first year of its organization. In the social circles of Herculaneum Mr. and Mrs. Marsh take a prominent part and they are recognized as progressive and representative citizens.

 

SAMUEL NICCOLLS pg 795
Samuel Niccolls, treasurer of the Standard Rail & Steel Company and well known in banking circles of the state, his business interests now centering in St. Louis, was born in Emporia, Kansas, November 3, 1871. His father, William T. Niccolls, was a native of Pennsylvania and on removing to the west in 1869 settled in Kansas. He conducted the first grocery store in Wichita, being the pioneer resident of that city. He continued to make his home in the Sunflower state until about 1874. when he removed to Ohio, where he resided for about three years. He then became a resident of DeSoto, Missouri, where he remained until 1907, when he came to St. Louis, where he is now living retired. During the greater part of his business life he followed mercantile pursuits and met with substantial success, owing to his careful direction of his business affairs, his sound judgment and unfaltering enterprise. During the Civil war he served under General Palmer and before the close of hostilities had risen to the rank of captain in the Anderson Troop. He wedded Mary Thomas, a native of Pennsylvania and a representative of one of the old families of that state. She also survives and they have become the parents of three children, Nellie, Samuel and Margaret, the last named being the wife of John W. Gray.

Samuel Nicolls was educated in the public schools of De Soto, Missouri, and when thirteen years of age started out to provide for his own support. His first position was that of messenger in the Jefferson County Bank at De Soto, where he remained
for two years. He then obtained a position with the Peoples Bank of De Soto, where he continued from 1889 to 1900, entering the institution as bookkeeper and winning“ advancement through intermediate positions to that of assistant cashier, in which capacity he was serving when he resigned in 1900 to become one of the organizers of the State Bank of Poplar Bluff, of which he continued as cashier until 1903. He then returned to the Peoples Bank as cashier and remained with the latter in that position until January, 1905, when he resigned to accept a position as one of the state bank examiners, continuing to serve in that capacity until July, 1907, when he resigned upon his election to the office of secretary of the Missouri-Lincoln Trust Company of St. Louis. Mr. Niccolls there continued until January, 1910, when he was elected cashier of the Washington National Bank and was a factor in the conduct and management of the institution until January, 1911. when the bank was consolidated with the American Trust Company. Mr. Niccolls was then elected vice president and so continued until August, 1918, when he resigned to accept the office of treasurer of the Standard Rail & Steel Company. This is his present business connection and one in which large responsibility devolves upon him, but his business qualifications, developed through long and wide experience, well qualify him for the duties that are his today.

Mr. Niccolls was married in De Soto, Missouri, in 1893, to Sarah E. Thomas, a native of Jefferson County, Missouri, and a daughter of Colonel W. H. H. and Rebecca (Brill) Thomas. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Niccolls: Frances, Mary Ann and Samuel, Jr. The family residence is maintained at Kirkwood and Mr. Niccolls is a prominent and active member of the Presbyterian Church there, serving as one of its trustees. He belongs to De Soto Lodge, No. 119, A. F. & A. M., having in that lodge been made a Mason. He has since taken the Knights Templar degree and also the degrees of the Scottish Rite. His political allegiance is given the Republican Party but the honors and emoluments of office have never had attraction for him. He started out in the business world without financial assistance or the aid of influential friends. Individual merit and ability have enabled him to work his way steadily upward and his success is due to his powers, his perseverance and his determination. He has justly won the proud American title of a self-made man.

 

ARCHIE WAYNE THOMPSON  pg 954
Prominent in the financial circles of Crystal City is Archie Wayne Thompson, cashier of the Crystal City State Bank. He was born in Conneautville, Pennsylvania, April 17, 1884, a son of Charles Henry and Clara Bell (Houghtaling) Thompson. The father is now living in Conneautville, Pennsylvania, actively engaged in the lumber business. He was born in Crawford county. He has held many local offices, has always been a staunch supporter of the democratic party and is a thirty-second degree Mason. Clara Bell Houghtaling is the daughter of Nathaniel Page Houghtaling, a retired farmer now living in Conneautville, who served in the Union army during the Civil war. He is now seventy-nine years of age and his wife is seventy-seven, and they are respected citizens of Conneautville. The paternal grandmother is also living and is eighty-three years of age. In the acquirement of an education Archie W. Thompson attended the public schools of Crawford County, Pennsylvania, until he was eight years of age at which time he entered the Conneautville schools. He left high school when seventeen years of age, and entered Clark’s Business College. After completing his commercial course he worked in a chair factory at Conneautville for about a year, but in 1913 removed to Crystal City and accepted a position as bookkeeper for the Crystal City State Bank In 1915 he was made assistant cashier of the bank and in 1919 was elected cashier, which position he still holds, to the great satisfaction of the bank and its patrons. Mr. Thompson is also secretary of the board of directors. The bank was organized on the 15th of November, 1911, with a capital stock of ten thousand dollars and a surplus of two thousand dollars. The capital stock has since been increased to twenty thousand dollars and the surplus and undivided profits are nearly thirteen thousand dollars. The bank proved to be a success from the start and its total resources have reached two hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars.

On the 15th of February, 1918, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Josephine S. Otto, the daughter of Joseph Otto, deceased, who was for many years a successful miller at Conneautville, Pennsylvania. Her father was born in Germany and emigrated to this country, settling in Pennsylvania, when a young man. Since age conferred upon Mr. Thompson the right of franchise he has been a staunch supporter of the democratic party, although he has never been very active in its interests and has neither sought nor desired public office. The religious faith of both Mr. and Mrs. Thompson is that of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the activities of which organization they take a prominent part. Fraternally Mr. Thompson is a Mason, holding membership in Western Crawford Lodge, No. 258, of Conneautville and Missouri Consistory, No. 1, of St. Louis, and he has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite.

Mr. Thompson saw active service in the World war. On the 28th of May, 1918, he was inducted into the service and sent to Camp Dodge at Des Moines. He was assigned to the Three Hundred and Thirty-Ninth Field Artillery and promoted to the rank of first-class private. He remained at Camp Dodge until August 24, 1918, when he sailed for France, landing at Liverpool. He spent some time at La Havre and was then sent to Les Martres de Veyre, in which latter place he remained until December 15, 1918. On the 8th of January, 1919, he sailed for home and received his discharge on the 5th of February. He was acting supply sergeant during his enlistment. Mr. Thompson is a prominent member of the American Legion, Pueblo-Vaughn-Wideman Post, No. 2 53, of Festus. For recreation Mr. Thompson turns to music of which he is a great lover, and he also spends much time in reading. He is most happy when in his own home and is devoted to his business interests.